singapore golden ale

No questions asked! Our resident Brewmaster’s modern take on the Golden Ale is hands down the hot favourite here! Refreshing like a lager, aromatic like a hopped ale yet low in bitterness with a light zesty twist at the end. The Singapore Golden Ale is brewed to suit Asians’ palate and specially crafted with Singapore’s all-year round summer in mind. Flavour: Refreshing crisp, aromatic with melon note, light fruitiness and zesty.

4%
Alc %
33
IBU

weissbier

Weissbier is the German word for ‘White Beer’. In the early 16th century, wheat was easily obtained from the Bavarian forests. The Bavarians fully utilised the same wheat to make beer by replacing a significant proportion of malted barley with wheat. A special strain of yeast is used to produce an overtone of banana as by-product during the fermentation. Flavour: Has a fuller mouthfeel, sweet with banana note

4.2%
Alc %
20
IBU

scotch ale

It was a name given to a strong pale ale from Edinburgh back in the 19th century. As it became regionalised later, this Scotland strong pale ale became known as the ‘Scotch Ale’. Not to be confused with Scottish Ale, Scotch Ale is the meatier brother which carries more weight in flavour! Sweet, maltier and hoppier! Also known as ‘Wee Heavy’, The Pump Room’s Scotch Ale is fuller-bodied with a sweet caramel character and a creamy finish. Flavour: Medium bodied, sweet caramel character and malty.

5.4%
Alc %
18
IBU

Munich lager (helles)

In the mid 19th century when the popularity of Bohemia Pilsner spread across Europe, München brewers responded with their version of lager to meet the demand in 1894. The bright yellow colour of the lager earns its name ‘Helles’ which means ‘bright’ in German. Flavour: Tastes like biscuit malt, slightly more malty than Pilsner. The hops profile is a little more subdued to balance with the malts.

4.2%
Alc %
22
IBU

pale ale

Because of its simplicity and how the top fermenting yeast does not require cooling technology, the English Pale Ale was considered the “most homebrewed beer” in the 17th century. It rose in popularity and became the 19th century’s most popular beer in U.K. just like the lager in Europe. Flavour: Light bodied, fruity with a moderate hops profile.

4.5%
Alc %
36
IBU

porter

Porter derived its name from the occupation of the manual labourers who drank this thirst-quenching beer for its liquid calories after a hard day’s work back in the 18th century. Like the true working-class hero, Porter was popular among the street and river porters – an important role in the early days of London.

5%
Alc %
18
IBU